Is private health insurance as “beloved” as Trump says?

 

President Trump is known for bizarre tweets, but this one does Democrats a particularly big favor.

Polling data shows Americans clearly DON’T love private health insurance companies and prefer Medicare.

Only 8% of Medicare beneficiaries 65 or over rated their coverage “fair” or “poor,” the nonprofit Commonwealth Fund found.

By comparison, 20% of those with employer-based coverage gave their insurance plan low marks. And 33% of people who bought insurance on their own reported unhappiness with their coverage.

In fact, trust in private health insurance companies has reached an all-time low.

With premiums and deductibles “far too high” as President Trump said, who wouldn’t want to lose their private health insurance in favor of Medicare?

Indeed, 56 percent of Americans surveyed by the Kaiser Family Foundation would prefer to get their health insurance from the federal government…and government health care has become even more popular with the phrase “Medicare for All” — phrasing that Trump used in his tweet.

Republicans are terrified of the idea of Medicare for All because of the additional tax burden it would create, particularly for their wealthy donors and the damage to private insurance schemes.

But would that be such a big loss? Is Trump saying that the Democrats are threatening us with a good time?

Democrats hammer Republicans on lawsuit seeking to void Obamacare (without mentioning it by name)

Senators Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Joe Donnelly (D-IN) are in close re-election dogfights in red states, and Republicans recently filed a lawsuit that just might help them keep their jobs.

Manchin’s and Donnelly’s opponents (Patrick Morrisey and Mike Braun, respectively) have voiced their support for a lawsuit filed by 20 Republican state attorneys general seeking to void the entire Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The patient protections in the name include prohibiting health insurance companies from discriminating against patients with pre-existing health conditions.

Donnelly and Manchin are calling them out on it without explicitly mentioning PPACA: a law whose actual provisions are popular with voters even though its name and especially its nickname (Obamacare) are not.

 

 

Link

The GOP’s “solution” to the high cost of health insurance is to make health insurance worthless.

Short-term plans can turn away people with preexisting conditions, including asthma and acne. They can charge older or sicker people prohibitively expensive premiums.

Or they can enroll such people at what looks like a bargain-basement price and then refuse to pay for any care related to preexisting illnesses — including illnesses that enrollees didn’t even know they had when they enrolled, such as cancer or heart disease. Some plans have dropped consumers as soon as they got an expensive diagnosis, sticking them with hundreds of thousands of dollars in unexpected medical bills.

Unlike Obamacare plans, short-term plans also are not required to cover any particular benefits, even for the relatively healthy.

A Kaiser Family Foundation review of short-term plans offered around the country found that most did not cover prescription drugs, and none covered maternity care. Preventive and mental-health care are also frequently excluded.

Catherine Rampell, The Washington Post, 8/3/2018

Worse yet, they can throw the markets for real health insurance into chaos.

This parallel system of insurance will siphon off healthier, younger, less expensive people from the exchanges. That will leave behind a pool of sicker, older, more expensive people, which will drive up premiums on the exchanges.

Between this and repealing the individual mandate, Republicans are actively sabotaging Obamacare to make it seem like a failure.

Health policy wonks of all stripes agree: GOP health plan is terrible

Despite the terrible news, I was heartened to see the phrase “healthcare policy wonks” in this article. It’s a shame these wonks weren’t included in writing the Republicans’ American Health Care Act (AHCA).

Experts from across the ideological spectrum who actually understand health care policy know that the GOP’s health care plan doesn’t pass muster.

Here are a few objections.

From the left

The repeal bill will transfer money from low-income and middle-class Americans to millionaires.
Topher Spiro and Harry Stein, Center for American Progress

From the center

Some parts of the country will see very large financial hits even if they retain coverage.
Matthew Fiedler, Brookings Institute

From the right

The flat credit will price many poor and vulnerable people out of the health insurance market.
Avik Roy, Foundation for Research on Equal Opportunity and health policy adviser to Rick Perry, Marco Rubio, and Mitt Romney presidential campaigns

This bill misses the mark primarily because it fails to correct the features of Obamacare that drove up health care costs.
Edmund F. Haislmaier, The Heritage Foundation

What happens to Pence’s HIP 2.0 if Obamacare is repealed?

I’ve written previously about the Healthy Indiana Plan started by former Indiana governor Mitch Daniels and updated to version 2.0 under Governor and Vice President-Elect Mike Pence as Indiana’s unique take on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act‘s Medicaid expansion.

In short, I’ve never been the biggest fan of Pence (to put it mildly), but I gave him credit where was due for finding a way to expand access to health care in Indiana even when it meant negotiating with his political rivals in the Obama administration.

But the Obama administration is about to come to an end, and the incoming Trump administration has made repealing and replacing PPACA (more commonly known as Obamacare) one of its top priorities in its first 100 days, which might cause as many as 21 million Americans to lose their health coverage.

Senate Democrats will have enough votes to filibuster any bill to repeal Obamacare, but just as Democrats got the fix-it bill through the Senate in 2010 via the budget reconciliation process to avoid a GOP filibuster, Republicans will probably not shy away from using the same tactic.

So, assuming Republicans go this route, what will happen to one of Pence’s signature achievements as governor of Indiana? After all, HIP 2.0 relies on the federal funds for the Medicaid expansion in the Affordable Care Act.

That’s going to be an awkward conversation.